LDA Educator Success Stories

LDA OF AMERICA

Educator Success Stories: Adults with Learning Disabilities

By: LDA Staff

Colin is a bright, verbal, gregarious 13-year-old who has struggled with reading since day one. His parents got him the best intervention available in Atlanta, and he worked intensively for almost four years in a high quality Orton-Gillingham school. Despite these efforts, Colin was one of the students that emerging research is identifying as “treatment resistors,” and he remained on 3rd grade reading level as he began middle school. Unwilling to give up on such a critical skill, Colin’s parents enrolled him in a well-known reading program, pulling him out of school for half days to work exclusively on literacy... (Read More)

5 Misconceptions about Learning Differences

PBS NEWSHOUR

Five Misconceptions about Learning Differences

By: Jason Kane

In the classroom, it starts simply — sometimes with a struggle to sound out simple words; sometimes with trouble telling time, memorizing the times tables or learning left from right. It often ends simply, too: with a troubling statistic. One in five of the American students identified as having a learning disability will walk away from their education. That’s compared to a dropout rate of 8 percent in the general population... (Read More).

Types of Learning Disorders

LDA OF AMERICA

Types of Learning Disorders

By: LDA Staff

Learning disabilities are neurologically-based processing problems. These processing problems can interfere with learning basic skills such as reading, writing and/or math.  They can also interfere with higher level skills such as organization, time planning, abstract reasoning, long or short term memory and attention.  It is important to realize that learning disabilities can affect an individual’s life beyond academics and can impact relationships with family, friends and in the workplace... (Read More).

Participation in Sailing Increases Self-Esteem

 

By: S. Kafka, Et Al

High self-esteem is related to a host of benefits, including positive moods, resilience, and initiative. Outdoor-based therapeutic experiences for at-risk youth are widely recognized as a means by which to raise their self-esteem levels. Increased self-esteem, however, may also be associated with several negative outcomes. For example, some research indicates that increased self-esteem may be associated with increased bias and prejudice against other groups, physical and verbal aggression, and engagement in a range of risky behaviors including drug and alcohol use. There is evidence to suggest that these negative outcomes can be prevented through the pursuit of increased self-esteem in a way that does not stress self-esteem as an end goal, but is focused on skill development and positive relationships with others. Existing research has shown outdoor interventions positively affect self-esteem. Developmental sail-training programs are one type of outdoor intervention specifically based on teamwork among program participants. Self-esteem increases resulting from participation in sail-training programs can persist months after program completion. The current paper summarizes three studies investigating the effects of a ten-day developmental sail-training voyage in New Zealand on self-esteem in adolescents and associated negative outcomes. The primary purpose of the set of studies was to establish whether or not self-esteem could be raised and sustained in adolescents, without associated negative outcomes... (Read More).